Extract: TV by Susan Bordo
Extract: TV by Susan Bordo

Extract: TV by Susan Bordo

"Television and I grew up together." As a baby boomer born in 1947, Susan Bordo is roughly the same age as our beloved gogglebox, which began life as a broad box with a ten-inch screen, chunky and clunky and encased in wood. With the rapid changes in technology in the years since, "television", as Bordo points out, has become estranged from its material status.
Why There are No Sports in my TV Book
Why There are No Sports in my TV Book

Why There are No Sports in my TV Book

Every book on the history of television has a chapter (or more) on sports. Mine doesn’t. The reason is simple: I can’t watch a sports event without smelling my father’s cigar.
TV
TV

TV

Weaving together personal memoir, social and political history, and reflecting on key moments in the history of news broadcasting and prime time entertainment, Susan Bordo opens up the 75-year-old time-capsule that is TV and illustrates what a constant companion and dominant cultural force television has been, for good and for bad, in carrying us from the McCarthy hearings and The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet to Mad Men, Killing Eve, and the emergence of our first reality TV president.
We Have Six Televisions
We Have Six Televisions

We Have Six Televisions

Are you surprised? Do you imagine that because I am a critic of popular culture I wouldn’t be caught dead watching Dance Moms? If so, you’ve been reading too many academics who came to popular culture only after it became Europeanized and hot. When I was in graduate school, the voracious maw of theory had only begun to invade and chew up the objects of everyday life into unrecognizable form. There were as yet no popular culture departments, the closest you could get was film studies—within which you could study Nosferatu but not Jaws.
TV
TV

TV

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Georgia’s On My Mind…
Georgia’s On My Mind…

Georgia’s On My Mind…

As we near a hugely consequential election, I present a tribute to Georgia via “Designing Women,” excerpted from my forthcoming book on growing up with television.

Opinion: The hidden metaphor in ‘Perry Mason’ finale
Opinion: The hidden metaphor in ‘Perry Mason’ finale

Opinion: The hidden metaphor in ‘Perry Mason’ finale

Susan Bordo is the author of many books of cultural history, feminist thought, and media criticism; TV, a volume in Bloomsbury’s “Object Lessons” series, is forthcoming in 2021. The views expressed in this commentary are her own. View more opinion articles on CNN. (CNN)For me and many others, HBO’s “Perry Mason” reboot has been a dark mirror — but after its season finale last week, an immensely satisfying one.

Why America is still not ready for Murphy Brown
Why America is still not ready for Murphy Brown

Why America is still not ready for Murphy Brown

What’s this item about? What makes it interesting? Write a catchy description to grab your audience’s attention…I get why Laura Bradley of Vanity Fair might opine that a “Murphy Brown” reboot “might actually be perfect for 2018.” With broadcast news coming at us 24/7, jam-packed with political outrages, “fake news” and looming constitutional crises, a newsroom-based sitcom would never lack topical material.

Hillary Clinton, the Media, and the “Optics” of Untrustworthiness
Hillary Clinton, the Media, and the “Optics” of Untrustworthiness

Hillary Clinton, the Media, and the “Optics” of Untrustworthiness

“Hey Cassie, I want to ask you a question. Do you think ‘honest’ and ‘straightforward’ mean the same thing?”

My 17-year-old daughter, whose favorite subject is not English, didn’t hesitate. “Totally different. Honest means telling the truth. Straightforward means you are blunt. You can lie in a blunt way.” Thank you, Cassie. Sure wish you had written the questions for the NBC/Wall Street Journal Presidential Survey. item about? What makes it interesting? Write a catchy description to grab your audience’s attention…